“Getting to Know Our Wines” Series – Italian Barolo

“Getting to Know Our Wines” Series – Italian Barolo

Visit Us on the Web – Click Here Our “Getting to Know Our Wines” series continues today with the “King” of the Piedmont Region. Remember, this week’s featured wine is available at our winery in Greenwood Village, today ONLY, for a 10% discount. Today’s Featured Wine is: Selection – Italian Barolo Piedmont is an area in the extreme north and west part of Italy at the top of the “boot.” The region is south and west of Milano. Barolo is a section of the Piedmont region where the namesake of the area, “Barolo” wine, came about in the 1800s made from nebbiolo grapes. Although wines in Italy are, in many ways, timeless, the Barolo is a relatively new entry to the Italian wine market with only a little over 200 years in production. Although considered a young wine, by Italian standards, the area where Barolo hails from has a long and rich history. Overall, the region has evolved very little in the nearly 2,000 years since the Roman legions marched in to pacify the region. It is believed that those Roman legions are the very ones that introduced the vines to the region that were nebbiolo's ancestors. As best scientists can determine, nebbiolo's grandsire was probably the aglianico. Incidentally, the aglianico is still, today, very much the pride of Basilicata, a region in the very south of Italy that helps form the instep of the Italian “boot.” Barolo is considered the King of the Piedmont Region, and aglianico (nebbiolo’s grandfather) remains a noble variety in its own right. Today, there are about 3,000 acres of nebbiolo producers in the various towns in the Piedmont area, including Barolo. The standard grape in most Barolos is still the nebbiolo (although sometimes Barbera is added to the Barolo), and despite its young history, the wine is still considered one of Italy's greatest wines. On its home territory, nothing about Barolo is of minimal interest. The residents of the region have a passionate belief that Barolo is less a wine than it is a way of life. A local Barolo aficionado and long time resident of the region was once quoted as saying: “As a young person, you love big, rich flavors—so you drink Barolo. In your middle age, you seek something more solid, something less obvious—so you drink Barolo. In your wisest years, you want a wine that allows you to think about and savor the pleasures of maturity, both its maturity and your own—so you drink Barolo." Originally, Barolos were often very rich in tannins because of the fermentation process employed. It was not uncommon for a Barolo to take more than 10 years to soften and become ready to drink. In order to appeal to more modern and international palates, which often prefer a fruitier and more accessible wine style, many Italian producers have began to use techniques to produce the Barolo in a style that is preferred by more palates around the world. This new style of Barolo fermentation is the one we use at the winery to produce our Barolo. Barolos have the potential for a wide range of complex and exotic aromas with tar and roses being common notes. We think you might also notice aromas like camphor, chocolate, dried fruit, damsons, eucalyptus, leather, licorice, mint, mulberries, plum, spice, strawberries, tobacco, white truffles as well as dried and fresh herbs. The flavors Barolos contain can vary a great deal. Overall, the flavors in Barolo are thick and complex. We think you will find some flowery notes—often violet or rose—but you can often sense more fruit type flavors and sometimes, licorice. Share this Post on Facebook by Clicking Below: “http://www.facebook.com/share.php?u=http://makingwineindenver.wordpress.com/2011/01/25/Personalized-Wedding-Wine-Italian-Barolo




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