“Getting to Know Our Wines” Series – Marsanne-Viognier-Roussanne

“Getting to Know Our Wines” Series – Marsanne-Viognier-Roussanne

Visit Us on the Web – Click Here Our “Getting to Know Our Wines” series continues today with another wine new to the Water 2 Wine-DTC collection.  This is another 2011 Limited Edition wine.  This one is just being released, but like all the other Limited Edition wines this year…we are certain it won’t be around for long!  So, hurry in to check it out and stock-up.  Remember, this week’s featured wine is available at our winery in Greenwood Village, today ONLY, for a 10% discount.  Today’s Featured Wine is: Marsanne – Viognier – Roussanne This new and exciting blend is becoming popular in California and Washington and pays tribute to the historical and traditional blends of Southern France. The exact origin of each of the varietals in this blend: Marsanne, Viognier and Roussanne, is unknown.  However, studies and historical records indicate that it is likely all three originated in the northern Rhône region.  Today, Marsanne is widely planted in the Northern Rhône region.  In fact, it is the most widely planted white wine grape in the French wine Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée (AOC) of Hermitage.  It is there where it first became popular to blend the Marsanne with Roussanne. As the popularity and plantings of Marsanne have increased in recent years, the plantings of Roussanne have declined.  However, the Roussanne has gained a stronghold in the southern Rhône where Roussanne is a primary component in the white wines of Châteauneuf-du-Pape where it can comprise as much as 80-100% of the wine.  Roussanne can also be found in some white wines from the French AOC of Côtes du Rhône. Although historical records seem to indicate a significant presence of Viognier in Roman times, in modern times, Viognier has became a rare white grape grown almost exclusively in the northern Rhône regions of France.  The decline of Viognier in France from its historic peak has much to do with the disastrous introduction of phylloxera insects from North America into Europe in the mid-and late-1800s, followed by the abandonment of the vineyards due to the chaos of World War I.   In the last ten years, there has been a massive increase in Viognier production throughout the world.  Both California and Australia now have significant amounts of land devoted to the Viognier grape.  The grapes for this specific wine come from the Yakima Valley region in Washington.  In Washington State, plantings of Marsanne continue to increase as producers blend it with Roussanne and Viognier.  However, both Marsanne and Roussanne are still in somewhat short supply in Washington, although quite prevalent and popular now in California.  When Washington Roussanne is blended with Viognier, it is often characterized by its “fruit salad” profile of notes that range from apple, lime, peach and citrus to cream and honey. We think you will notice melon and nutty notes from the Marsanne while detecting aromatics of white peach, apricot, melon, guava, spiced pear and violets from the Viognier.  The Roussanne will become prominent on the finish with some additional nuttiness and hints of rose and honeysuckle. This wine pairs beautifully with chicken, turkey, ham, pork, and lamb, cream based curries and soups, including clam chowder, mushrooms, onions and squash.  This wine is also one of the few that can stand up to the spice of Indian and Thai dishes. Share this Post on Facebook by Clicking Below:http://www.facebook.com/share.php?u=http://makingwineindenver.wordpress.com/2011/07/19/preservative-free-wine-getting-to-know-our-wines-marsanne-viognier-roussanne“




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