“Getting to Know Our Wines” Series – U.S. Pinot Noir

“Getting to Know Our Wines” Series – U.S. Pinot Noir

Visit Us on the Web – Click Here Our “Getting to Know Our Wines” series continues today with a classic California Pinot Noir.  Remember, this week’s featured wine is available at our winery in Greenwood Village, today ONLY, for a 10% discount.  Today’s Featured Wine is: United States Pinot Noir Pinot Noir is a light red wine that dates all the way back to the time of the Gauls who planted the Pinot Noir vines before the Roman invasion.  The vines quickly spread into France where Pinot Noir emerged in vineyards by 150 BC.   Because of its emergence in France so many years ago, it is not surprising that the Pinot Noir grape is the main grape used in much of French Burgundy.  Today, Pinot Noir grapes are grown around the world, mostly in the cooler regions, but the grape is still most commonly associated with the Burgundy region in France.  Many world renowned sommeliers feel the Pinot Noir makes the best wine in the world with great versatility for pairings and an outstanding spectrum of flavors and aromas, while others feel it has become too predictable and mainstream.  Regardless of the debate amongst the world’s great wine makers and connoisseurs, once you fall in love with a Pinot Noir you are likely to find yourself so smitten that you never go back to other reds!  Pinot Noirs are light with a  fruity flavor and not much of the red wine “bite” typically encountered with other red varietals.  Pinot Noir is a good transition wine for those use to drinking white wines or sweeter wines and want to try drinking reds. Early studies of the varietal indicated that pinot noir was a cross between Pinot Meunier and Traminer; however, the early research indicating the origins of the Pinot Noir has never been replicated.  In fact, recent studies show that pinot meunier actually contains two different tissue layers with distance genetic makeups.  One of these layers is identical to Pinot Noir which means the pinot meunier cannot be the parent of Pinot Noir.  It is interesting to note that pinot gris and pinot blanc are both also genetically identical to pinot noir and to each other.  Why then does Pinot Noir produce a red wine and pinot gris and pinot blanc produce white wines?  It is believed there was, at some time, a slight mutation in the Pinot Noir affecting only the genes that control grape color, resulting in the pinot gris and pinot blanc.   This particular pinot noir is from the Sonoma valley in California.  We think you might notice supple and spicy aromas with a good mix of fruit on the palate.  This wine pairs beautifully with salmon, tuna, scallops, pheasant and quail. Share this Post on Facebook by Clicking Below:http://www.facebook.com/share.php?u=http://makingwineindenver.wordpress.com/2011/10/18/preservative-free-wine-getting-to-know-our-wines-US-pinot-noir“




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